FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

Click on the blue rectangular boxes below to find the answer to your questions. If you can't find the answer you're looking for, do get in touch with us.

You can join Junior Sea Cadets at 10, Sea Cadets at 12 and Royal Marines Cadets at 13. Get in touch and we’ll be really happy to arrange a visit, so you can look round the unit and see what’s involved, and speak to volunteers and cadets, before deciding if you’d like to join. If you do, there’s an application form to fill out which the unit can go through with you.

Please bring a Parent/Guardian with you on your first visit so they're able to complete the consent forms.

Subscriptions are £10 a month which are usually paid by standing order. We are determined that nobody should miss out because they can’t afford it, and help is always available. There are charges for training courses and camps but these are kept to a minimum. Sometimes you can get a bursary or grant for activities like our week-long voyages sailing offshore.

Most of the uniform is provided by the charity and will be issued to you on joining. Cadets have to purchase their own boots and Junior Cadets have to buy a Sea Cadets jumper and t-shirt. When joining speak to the unit's Commanding Officer to find out what you'll need.

The Royal Navy is our biggest supporter and we work according to their customs and traditions, which means that cadets enter a rank structure on joining. As they learn and master new skills, cadets rise through the structure and progress up the ranks. More qualified Sea Cadets often share in the guiding of younger, less qualified cadets. A cadet can progress from a New Entry Cadet all the way up to Petty Officer Cadet or Cadet Sergeant. If you wish to go on and join the Royal Navy, great; but Sea Cadets is for everyone, whatever you want to do in life.

There are many, and they include; qualifications from the Royal Yachting Association (RYA), the British Canoeing Union (BCU), the British Sub Aqua Club, St John Ambulance Brigade, the Institute of Leadership and Management, plus others. You can also achieve BTEC qualifications. We keep our syllabuses very current and relevant to young people and where appropriate, align them to nationally recognised awards.

As a Sea Cadet you can choose to work towards a BTEC in Teamwork and Personal Skills or Music as part of your normal Sea Cadet activities. This is a nationally recognised qualification which is equivalent to four GCSEs at grade C (four standard grades at level 3 in Scotland).

Yes you can and, even better, you can complete it as part of your normal Sea Cadet activities because our activities and training programme naturally tick off all the sections required.

The Royal Navy is our biggest supporter and in 2017 we completed a renewal of our Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with the Ministry Of Defence. This, together with a Partnering Charter, reaffirms the strong relationship between the Sea Cadets and the Royal Navy and sets out the basis for this going forward.



Every unit is run entirely by volunteers. We have 14,000 young people and many more hoping to join a local unit near them. Volunteers help and guide our cadets so they can grow and develop in a safe environment. If more adults join and help out, it will allow more young people to experience the thrill of being a Sea Cadet.

No previous Sea Cadet or volunteer experience is needed! Energy and enthusiasm are the qualities we’re looking for. You can make use of any existing skills you have or we can help you learn new ones.

No, it is up to the individual volunteer whether they choose to wear a uniform or not. Although Sea Cadets is a uniformed organisation, we have a mixture of uniformed instructors and civilian instructors. There is no pressure or requirement to wear a uniform.

Yes, definitely. There are lots of ways to volunteer for Sea Cadets and help your local unit, with a variety of roles to choose from, and we are happy to hear from everyone regardless of how much free time they have to give.

As a voluntary organisation we are unable to pay volunteers for the time they give. If you help out at camps, competitions, and events, your out of pocket expenses will be covered though. However we think that you’ll find you gain a great deal from volunteering at Sea Cadets, with the chance to take part in adventure activities both on and off the water, learn new skills, gain qualifications and meet new people.

As long as you are over 18 years of age, you can help out as a volunteer once you have completed a successful DBS check. There is no upper age limit for volunteers as long as you remain fit and healthy and able to assist in one role or another.

Get in touch and we’ll be really happy to arrange a visit, so you can look round the unit and see what’s involved, and speak to volunteers and cadets, before deciding if you’d like to join. If you do, there’s an application form to fill out which we will go through with you.

Yes. All volunteers are covered under MOD indemnity our Personal Accident and Medical Expenses Policy.

Yes certainly, many of our volunteers have been in the Royal Navy or other Armed Forces. Their skills, experience and enthusiasm give cadets a unique insight and can add greatly to the cadet experience. We also welcome those with experience in the Merchant Navy and other youth organisations.

No, not at all, we are looking for people with enthusiasm and energy and who are committed to helping young people reach their goals.

Yes definitely and we’d like to hear from you! Many of our volunteers have children, nephews and nieces in Sea Cadets, so they can see first hand how it benefits young people. Plus volunteering enables you to give something back and spend more time with your child. It's enjoyable, gives you more skills and allows you to share these with the next generation. Speak to your child’s Commanding Officer to discuss how you might become involved.



Get in touch and we’ll be really happy to arrange a visit, so you and your child can look round the unit and see what’s involved, and speak to volunteers and cadets, before your child decides if they’d like to join. If they do, there’s an application form to fill out which the we'll go through with you.

Subscriptions are £10 a month which are usually paid by standing order. We are determined that nobody should miss out because they can’t afford it, and help is always available. There are charges for training courses and camps but these are kept to a minimum. Sometimes you can get a bursary or grant for activities like our week-long voyages sailing offshore.

There are many, and they include; qualifications from the Royal Yachting Association (RYA), the British Canoeing Union (BCU), the British Sub Aqua Club, St John Ambulance Brigade, the Institute of Leadership and Management plus others. You can also achieve BTEC qualifications. We keep our syllabuses current and relevant to young people and where appropriate, align them to nationally recognised awards.

They are our biggest supporter and we work based on the traditions and ethos of the Royal Navy. In 2012 we completed a renewal of our Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with the Ministry Of Defence. This, together with a Partnering Charter, reaffirms the strong relationship between the Sea Cadets and the Royal Navy and sets out the basis going forward.

No, most of the uniform is provided by the Charity and will be issued to your son/daughter on joining. You may need to buy boots though, but we'll help out if we can. For those aged 10 to 12 years old you may need to buy them a Juniors jumper and t-shirt.

We take complaints very seriously and we treat them as an opportunity to develop. This is why we are always very grateful to hear from people who are willing to take the time to help us improve. We always thank people who contact us about their problems, concerns or worries.

Speak to the Commanding Officer on a parade night, or alternatively you can email us at info@hartlepoolscc.co.uk

Not at all. Some teenagers do, and Sea Cadets helps to develop a way of thinking and some skills that can be helpful when applying for a job in the Royal Navy. But Sea Cadets is not a recruiting ground for the military – that same way of thinking is just as useful for any other kind of job your son or daughter wants to go into.

Yes definitely and we’d like to hear from you! Many of our volunteers have children, nephews and nieces in Sea Cadets, so they can see first hand how it benefits young people. Plus volunteering enables you to give something back and spend more time with your child. It's enjoyable, gives you more skills and allows you to share these with the next generation. Speak to your child’s Commanding Officer to discuss how you might become involved.